Anyone have a spare M10/45 grip plastic?

Erehton

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My original has developed a crack. Anyone here have a plastic rear grip to sell?
 

Deerhurst

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I very well may have one too if all else fails. I think there is one in the Mac parts drawer.
 

Tinman45

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Print one?

Edit- I realize this user’s immediate problem was ably solved by community, just thinking in the future that’s the kind of thing where someone might just post the STL?
 

MitchWerbellsGhost87

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Print one?

Edit- I realize this user’s immediate problem was ably solved by community, just thinking in the future that’s the kind of thing where someone might just post the STL?
There are some printed 380 grips on the market. The issue is that they don’t look like the real thing at all. If someone doesn’t care about authenticity then printing would be fine, but if you are going for the OEM look, printed grips just don’t hack it.
 

MitchWerbellsGhost87

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I have a resin printer. If I get the texture right you'll never know the difference except for no mold parting lines.
I don’t think I’ve ever seen this, I’ve only seen the printed grips and other printed stuff where you can see the lines.
 

Deerhurst

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Now we're talking. Have you resin printed any gun parts? I'm rocking a anycubic vyper.
I've used my resin printer to do tight tolerance mock ups of parts and FCGs I've designed.

I use a resin printer with much nicer resin at work for all sorts of things from small motor mounts and mock ups to handles, covers, etc.
 

Deerhurst

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I don’t think I’ve ever seen this, I’ve only seen the printed grips and other printed stuff where you can see the lines.
The most common layer thickness of a FDM printer is 0.2mm thick due to the most common nozzle size being 0.4mm. FDM is like a CNC hot glue gun.

A resin printer is whacky. Turn a filament printer upside down, remove the X and Y axis, put a screen under the upside down bed and put a cut with a clear bottom on top of the screen and fill the cup with resin.

Resin printer used a UV light through a monochrome LCD display to cure each layer which the bed pulls off the clear layer on the bottom of the vat with each layer and allows fresh resin to flow between the vat bottom and the.park being made. With the multiple FDM printers I manage I use 0.4mm nozzles and get 0.2mm layers. With the resin printer I use 0.05mm layers and with the right resin and a little polishing I can get optically clear parts.

Resins are harder and often more.brittle than FDM parts done in PLA or ABS. I am experimenting with resins that are supposed to have properties similar to ABS and have had very good results. They are expensive, cheap end is $60 for a liter. Many resins tend to be sensitive to scratching too and it is best to paint or otherwise protect the final product from UV from the sun because like all plastics UV will degrade them over time. It's ironic that they are also built and cured using UV.
 

Gaujo

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Ya I've watched vids on it, it looks pretty cool and is much smoother looking. The filaments and the resins are really where the development is needed right now, to both make better ones and make the nylons and other expensive ones cheaper. The FDM filaments fit for making gun receivers are so expensive right now.

I recon in 10 years 3d printing will be without lines and without many of the drawbacks we have today.
 

Deerhurst

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The hard part with things like nylons are the temperatures and the environment needed to work with the fancy materials.

You will always have some form of layer lines with additive manufacturing. We have them to some extent with subtractive still.

Working firearms can be made with some of the cheapest filaments, the pressure areas still need to be metals generally.
 

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