Welding an Uzi Selector Stop

turbo9441

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I need to have a selector stop welded into a full auto Uzi grip converting it to semi. Who does that type of work? Thanks!
 

amphibian

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I see several on Gunbroker already done and refinished. I have NO affiliation with the seller
 

slimshady

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Anybody with a welder and some skill? The grip assembly is an unregulated part, anyone can weld on it. Welding shop, auto repair, your neighbor, etc.
 

Jones

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Cleanest way is to drill a hole in it and have a welder with a TIG or MIG plug weld it in.
These days, the biggest trick is to find someone who doesn't get all goosey about welding on anything gun-related.

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cvasqu03

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OK, while we're at this, I figure it's an opportunity to ask a few questions. Over the holidays I'm being forced to take some time off so I'm considering finally working on some similar projects. I'm thinking of trying this on three pistol grips I've been saving but I don't have the facilities to get a big welder. I've found a relatively inexpensive and more importantly small and portable stick welder that I've been thinking of getting. So here's my question; if I wanted to do this using SMAW, what stick should I use? In other words, what stick would be the closest approximation to the metal in the grip frame?

While on the subject, what stick would be the best to use on an UZI receiver? Also, how thick is a standard UZI receiver? I'd heard 3mm, but also heard it might vary so I'd like to hear from those more knowledgeable.
 

Jones

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For what it's worth; most sheet metal in firearms is mild steel. 1018, or if you're hogging parts out of a billet, A36 is a good choice and the two weld together without any problems.
 

cvasqu03

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For what it's worth; most sheet metal in firearms is mild steel. 1018, or if you're hogging parts out of a billet, A36 is a good choice and the two weld together without any problems.
Forgive my ignorance, as I'm just starting out, but what would 1018 translate to as a welding rod? Would that be a 7018 stick or something else? If it makes any difference, I'm going to try to keep to a 3/32" rod for now since I'll just be starting out, though I do plan to practice making a straight line for a while before I tackle anything heavy.
 

Jones

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1018 is usually just referred to as "mild steel". Not a lot of carbon so it won't (can't be) hardened.
With your selector block-into-grip frame job; let it air cool-- don't quench it.

E6011 sounds like it's more forgiving than E7018.
6011 just needs to be kept dry while 7018 is best stored in a heated rod oven.
7018 is more for higher carbon content steels that you may want to temper.
Here's a pretty good article comparing the two. https://weldzone.org/6011-vs-7018/

Always a good idea to practice first; making sure your practice pieces are the same material as the piece you'll be welding.
 

cvasqu03

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1018 is usually just referred to as "mild steel". Not a lot of carbon so it won't (can't be) hardened.
With your selector block-into-grip frame job; let it air cool-- don't quench it.

E6011 sounds like it's more forgiving than E7018.
6011 just needs to be kept dry while 7018 is best stored in a heated rod oven.
7018 is more for higher carbon content steels that you may want to temper.
Here's a pretty good article comparing the two. https://weldzone.org/6011-vs-7018/

Always a good idea to practice first; making sure your practice pieces are the same material as the piece you'll be welding.
Thanks for sharing that article, that's great info. It looks like for me, the E6011 would be the way to go. I do have one additional question though. Say I was going to attempt to weld on receiver pieces to try making a semi UZI receiver, would the 6011 work for that as well? I'm not planning to heat treat the receiver, but I think I remember reading back in the day that Vector heat treated their receivers once they were completed so I wasn't sure if the metal on receivers is significantly different than on the trigger housing.
 

Jones

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This from the manufacturer of full-size, mini and micro sheet metal;
The sheet metal basically just keeps all the components together in one neat package. Any heavy loading is handled by the trunnion, feed ramp, and the rear plate that the buffer pushes against (extra thick for strength and as a folding stock mounting point).

Not sure how Vector is using the term "heat treated". It's an umbrella term that means different things to different folks.
"Tempering" means making a part harder by heating then quenching.
"Annealing" means heating a part up the letting it cool very slowly (sometimes in an insulating blanket) to soften it and make it more ductile and easier to work.
"Normalizing" is often used interchangeability with annealing. Usually follows tempering to "relax" the metal making it less brittle but tougher.
Heating to red hot and quenched hardens the part. The metal surface is then polished and heated until the surface just shows a "straw" color then quenched again. This "draws back" a little of the hardness, replacing brittle with more springy.
Normalizing is also done to raw steels to make them uniformally workable. A piece of cold rolled steel has hard outer surfaces from the rolling process. If you surface (machine off the hardened layer) on one side, the remaining opposite face will curl that piece of flat stock into the nicest looking leaf spring you ever saw.
 

Roaster72

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I need to have a selector stop welded into a full auto Uzi grip converting it to semi. Who does that type of work? Thanks!
Show up at my house with a six pack. Let me know first because I'm out of C25.
 

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