chamber/barrel question

GK8041

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Greetings gents. I'm curious about what appears to be a cut in the breech portion of the barrel. Is this factory machining, or related to wear/damage? If intentional what mechanical purpose does the cut serve? Note - the pic on the left is a SA RPB variant. Not sure about the other.

Thanks in advance for the info.
 

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MitchWerbellsGhost87

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Yeah, like the other guy said. It’s cut to clear the extractor on the older style cast bolts. It’s normal and it’s supposed to be there. The gun in the other pic is a Jersey Arms Works M10 “Commando Avenger” by the way.
 

GK8041

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Makes sense. Both pics were from samples for sale and not mine. I'm here to get some M10 smarts before buying/bidding on a pre-ban SA or possibly NFA "Mac", preferably RPB/PS manufactured 9mm or .45...which inexplicably I've not been been interested in before.
 

A&S Conversions

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For additional information, there could be an issue with an open bolt semi in the long term. Just like open bolt guns, ATF has also ruled that AR-15 DIASs are machineguns. There was a case of pre '81 DIASs. The owner supposedly had documentation that the DIASs in his possession were made before the '81 ruling. The judge ruled that only the Legislative Branch can "grandfather" items from a certain date. The ATF is under the Executive Branch and can only rule whether an item is or is not a machinegun because of function. If an item is, by definition, a machinegun. Only those machineguns entered into the registry by May 19, 1986 can be possessed by private individuals.

Yet again the ATF has over stepped their authority. When manufacturers started making semi auto open bolt pistols. I don't know whether the manufacturers submitted samples. I would think so. The point of a determination letter is to help manufacturers from bringing illegal firearms to market. Years after open bolt pistols being produced, the ATF ruled that open bolt firearms were "easily converted " to machineguns. So the open bolt mechanism is automatically considered a machinegun and must be registered as such.

The manufacturers stopped producing open bolt pistols, but where does this leave those alread having been produced? I don't know. Since there is a limited number they have become a collectors item. So the market value of an open bolt pistol is considerably higher than a closed bolt version of the same model.

Is the ATF going to raid your home because you have an open bolt pistol made before they decided such a pistol was a machinegun? I doubt it. Do I have any interest in adding such a pistol to my collection? No, because as a high capacity pistol, they suck compared to something like a Glock for four times the money.

The open bolt transferable registered receiver machineguns have high market value because of the transferable machinegun status. They are a very cost-effective way, with additional accessories, to own a match winning submachinegun or medium rifle caliber machinegun.

"GK8041", if you have any interest in owning an entry level transferable machinegun, I would highly recommend you gather the funds and buy one. I sold most of my semi auto collection to buy my first machinegun. I consider it the best move I have ever made in my firearm collecting life. I would not spend the market value on an open bolt semi. It has all of the downsides of the RR with none of the pluses. Welcome to the community. Good luck with your search.

Scott
 

GK8041

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Helpful post Scott. Needless to say the M10 is an iconic American piece and I've come around to appreciate it. I agree the SA, pre-ban, open bolt factory guns out there - even if legal for title 1 transfer - come with too much baggage, and are stupid pricey for what they are anyhow.

With recent advances in aftermarket accessories the NFA M10s can have some practicality/versatility on the range. I remember being offered a NFA M10 in original boxing for $1300. I laughed at it. Instead I payed an astronomical $8.5K for a transferable sear/HK Mp5K-pdw host. Sold it years later for almost triple. To be single, then to be married with kid right? Of course now it hurts to think about those numbers comparatively.

We'll see, I may throw in again.
 

Deerhurst

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I like to collect open bolt 22s. If you know what you are looking for they can be cheaper than a new 10/22. Hard part sometimes is mags. For two that I have mags are worth $400 when I paid $200 a rifle. Both have modified mags from later guns because mags are so rare. Valmet m76 mags are almost as easy as to find a TP at Walmart in comparison.

If you don't exercise your rights you lose them.

MG prices are insane but a great investment as you stated, if you intend to sell it one day.
 

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