Receiver Markings

 

 


Each of the UZI models is uniquely identified by the markings found on its receiver. The markings are usually stamped on the sides of the receiver, below the rear site. Here's how to identify your favorite UZI:


The Israeli IMI UZI SMG:

The original Israeli UZI's are Hebrew marked. This sample was taken off the cut receiver of a parts kit.

 


The pre 1968 IMI UZI SMG:

UZI's manufactured for export had receiver markings in English rather than Hebrew. A very small number of UZI SMG's were imported in the United States prior to the Gun Control Act of 1968. During the one month amnesty offered in 1968, some portion of those original UZI's (less than 100) were registered as NFA firearms and are now transferable weapons.

 


The IMI UZI SMG:

Action Arms imported Law Enforcement only UZI's with English markings.

 


The ERO UZI SMG:

ARMA in Croatia manufactures a copy of the IMI UZI.

 


The IMI UZI 45 SMG:

Action Arms imported Law Enforcement only UZI's in 45ACP.

 


The Fabrique Nationale UZI  SMG:

Fabrique Nationale (FN) traded FAL parts for UZI parts with Israel. FN assembled and finished the UZIs and put their own receiver marks on them.

 


The IMI Mini UZI:

Action Arms imported Law Enforcement only Mini UZI's with English markings.

 


The IMI Mini UZI Closed Bolt:

The closed bolt version of the Mini UZI had a different prefix on the serial number.

 


The IMI Model A Semi Auto:

IMI produced a semi automatic version of the UZI that was imported into the United States by Action Arms. It had a 16.1" barrel and a folding stock.

 


The IMI Model B Semi Auto:

In 1983, IMI replaced the Model A with the Model B. The sights were the most noticeable difference but other small changes were also included.

 


The IMI Model 41 Semi Auto:

The Model 41 was just a Model B semi automatic in .41 AE. The receivers were original stamped Model 45 and were later milled out and restamped. The .41 AE cartridge has a rebated rim that is the same size as the 9mm, so it uses the same bolt as a 9mm Model B. The Model 41 can be converted to 9mm by putting in a 9mm barrel and magazine.

 


The IMI Model 45 Semi Auto:

The Model 45 was just a Model B semi automatic in .45 ACP. It can be converted to 9mm by replacing the barrel, bolt and magazine.

 


The IMI Mini Carbine Semi Auto:

The semi automatic Mini UZI Carbine had markings on the bottom of the receiver instead of the right side due to the receiver contour.

 


The 9mm UZI Pistol:

9mm semi automatic UZI pistol imported by Action Arms.

 


The Model 45 UZI Pistol:

45 ACP semi automatic UZI pistol imported by Action Arms.

 


The UZI Pistol (Springfield):

9mm semi automatic UZI pistol imported by Springfield Armory. Only one small batch (100-200 pistols) were imported by Springfield Armory in the early 1990's.

 


The Mini Pistol:

The UZI Mini Pistol was released by Vector Arms in November, 2004. It's built on IMI Mini UZI Carbine receivers but does not have a stock so it qualifies as a pistol.

 


The Group Industries UZI SMG:

The full size UZI carbine manufactured by Group Industries in the United States.

 


The Group Industries UZI Semi:

The full size UZI semi automatic carbine manufactured by Group Industries in the United States. Note the "S" after the model number, indicating it's a semi automatic.

 


The Vector Arms UZI SMG:

Vector UZI's are made from Group Industries receivers. They have the same markings as the Group Industries marks above, plus they are stamped on the left side with this information. The Vector Mini UZI is made from a cut down UZI receiver and so it has the same markings as the full size UZI.

 


The SARCO Semi Auto:

SACRO sold some semi automatic full size UZI receivers. They were marked on the bottom of the receiver and had no markings at all on the sides. The receivers were marked:

IMI ISRAEL
N H M CO SAC CA

These importer marks stand for "New Helvetia ? Company, Sacramento, California." The bottom was also stamped with a serial number. The receivers were manufactured pre-ban but never assembled so they need to be treated as post-ban for anyone assembling a kit.

 


The Norinco 320 Semi Auto UZI:

The left side of the Norinco receivers had a "Police Model" marking. The US government decided that it would have to be removed before importation so it would not be confused with some sort of "law enforcement only" marking.

 


The Mini IMI imported by UZI America, Inc:

The standard IMI Mini UZI was imported into the United States in the late 1990's by UZI America, Inc., a subsidiary of O.F. Mossberg & Sons. As required by law, the guns were stamped with the country or origin, the importer and the city and state of the importer. Note the "CB" in the serial number indicates that it was a closed bolt gun.


The Micro IMI imported by UZI America, Inc:

The standard IMI Micro UZI was imported into the United States in the late 1990's by UZI America, Inc., a subsidiary of O.F. Mossberg & Sons. As required by law, the guns were stamped with the country or origin, the importer and the city and state of the importer.


The Micro UZI:

The Micro UZI as distributed in Europe. It has the standard IMI markings but does not have US importation marks on it.


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